APPENDIX I-U: Sinha, et al, Species variation in pesticide-induced blood-brain barrier dysfunction, Human & Experimental Toxicology, Vol. 22, No. 12, 647-652 (2003)

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Human & Experimental Toxicology, Vol. 22, No. 12, 647-652 (2003)
DOI: 10.1191/0960327103ht405oa
2003 SAGE Publications

Species variation in pesticide-induced blood-brain barrier dysfunction

Chaitali Sinha

Predictive Toxicology Research Group, Industrial Toxicology Research Centre, Lucknow, India

Girja S Shukla

Surgery Department, University of Vermont, College of Medicine, E303 Given Bldg., Burlington, VT 05405, USA Girja.Shukla@uvm.edu

Neurological disorders following acute or chronic exposure to pesticides have been reported in a number of human cases. However, the mechanism(s) by which pesticides produce central nervous system dysfunction is not clear. The objective of the present study was to examine the functional status of blood-brain barrier (BBB) in rats and mice exposed to selected pesticides of different chemical groups. Adult male albino rats and mice were exposed (1/10 of LD50) daily to dichlorvos (organophosphate), lindane (organochlorine) and carbofuran (carbamate) through oral intubation for 3 days. The status of BBB was evaluated by determining brain sodium fluorescein dye uptake and brain uptake index (BUI) in relation to serum dye level. The brain dye uptake and BUI in pesticide-exposed rats did not differ significantly in comparison to that of controls. However, brain dye uptake and BUI were increased significantly in mice exposed to dichlorvos (85%, 40%), lindane (79%, 26%) and carbofuran (129%, 61%). The results of this study show that mouse BBB system is more sensitive to pesticide-induced breach as compared to that of rat. These variations may have a role in determining the outcome of pesticide neurotoxicity in different species.

Key Words: blood-brain barrier carbofuran dichlorvos lindane neurotoxicity species difference